Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

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Projects - Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed 01

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Macquarie Wharf No.2 Shed

Project Information

Envisaged as the Southern Gateway, the Macquarie Wharf Shed 02 redevelopment comprises of two stages, the site masterplan and the redevelopment project.

Completed April 2011, the initial feasibility study and masterplan for the site was undertaken by Circa Architecture & Stanton Management in conjunction with the Tasmanian Ports Corporation. The existing shed has been used over a number of years as the arrival point for domestic cruise ships to Hobart, and the study examined how to deal with the increasing demand for this as well as place the development within the context of the recently completed Sullivan’s Cove Masterplan. The masterplan also dealt with new traffic circulation including tour bus & taxi arrangements.

The increasing use of Hobart as a cruise liner destination, together with the relocation of the re-provisioning section of the Australian Antarctic Division operations in Antarctica, the decision was made to revitalise the old shed as an Arrival Building for Cruise Liner Passengers and in the remaining part of the shed to house AAD’s Central Provedoring Centre for all its operations on the Antarctic continent.

The shell of the warehouse remained intact, but the shed had all its later accretions removed, and a large new opening made in the western end, in order to give the shed a civic presence as a new waterfront Forecourt, which now fronts its neighbour, Mac 01.

The cruise liner section of the building has become much loved by MONA, who rate it as the best venue for live rock music with an audience of 3 to 4,000 people. To quote one of the international MoFo 2014 musicians, Chris Thirle: It looks like an aircraft hanger and sounds like a church....

COMPLETED

2013

PHOTO CREDITS

Peter Whyte